Robert Louis Stevenson gets his revenge on sneaky literary agent – 120 years later

The Treasure Island author’s fairytales are finally to be published in one set, as he intended

Robert Louis Stevenson lived out his last years on a Samoan island. Photograph: Bettmann/Corbis
The literary betrayal of one of the most popular writers in the English language, Robert Louis Stevenson, is to be avenged in the first collected edition of the great Scottish writer’s little-known Samoan fairytales. => http://bit.ly/eNcyY4

Uncensored Picture of Dorian Gray published

Over 120 years after it was condemned as ‘vulgar’ and ‘unclean’, an uncensored version of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray is published by Harvard University Press => http://bit.ly/muGqFO

Recently released – the author says this is “far and away the greatest story in Australia’s history, if not the world’s.”

Batavia

Peter FitzSimons

The shipwreck of the Batavia combines in just the one tale the birth of the world’s first corporation, the brutality of colonisation, the battle of good versus evil, the derring-do of sea-faring adventure, mutiny, love, lust, blood-lust, petty fascist dictatorship, criminality, a reign of terror, murders most foul, sexual slavery, natural nobility, survival, retribution, rescue, first contact with native peoples and so much more. => http://bit.ly/m5iXQl

Karl Lagerfeld to create fragrance that smells of books

The book-aholic has found the cure for everyone who misses the smell of paper in these digital times: a perfume that smells of books, thanks to a “fatty” olfactory mark. http://ind.pn/fDX3ux

AbeBooks’ Top 10 Most Expensive Sales in March 2011

For a collector of modern first editions, there are few books put on a higher pedestal than The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. Last month a collector purchased a first edition of this novel, via AbeBooks, for more than $20,000. The Hobbit is considered the archetypal epic fantasy novel and is thoroughly entrenched in popular culture, but this was not always the case. Published in 1937, the book was a slow burning success, receiving encouraging reviews and earning subsequent printings and a North American release after several months.

The book really took off in the 1960s when publishers reissued a massive number of affordable copies in the United States. Bilbo Baggins, Gandalf, Smaug the dragon and Gollum have become some of the most famous fictional characters in literature. Gollum’s hissed catchphrase ‘My Precious’ is known around the world.

Two other modern firsts to appear on March’s list of pricey sales were a signed copy of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick and Cormac McCarthy’s semi-autobiographical novel Suttree. => more

New movie “Dirt Music”based on Tim Winton’s novel

Oscar winner Rachel Weisz and Colin Farrell have joined the cast of Phillip Noyce’s “Dirt Music,” based on Tim Winton’s novel of the same name, international sales, financing and production label HanWay Films said Saturday. Set in North Western Australia, the movie adaptation of Winton’s novel is set to begin shooting Down Under in August. http://bit.ly/iiWwXB

Book of the Year for Younger Children in the 2010 Australian Book Industry Awards

Baby Wombat’s Week

by Jackie French

He sleeps. He eats. He gets bored.

He creates havoc wherever he goes!

He’s Mothball’s baby – and he’s even cuter, naughtier and more determined than his mum.

Created by writer Jackie French and illustrator Bruce Whatley, Baby Wombat?s Week is an irresistible new picture book by the award-winning duo of the international bestseller Diary of a Wombat.

The very long awaited follow up to Diary of a Wombat – the illustrations are as beautiful as ever and the simple story will be adored by young children. Best of all, Mothball herself features in the story. Adults with an appreciation of Australian wildlife and children’s literature will cherish these books as well. Weaver has the obstinate behaviour of wombats down pat but her affection for the animals is very obvious.

Teachers Notes => bit.ly/er2ur5

Buy the book => http://bit.ly/gLXAkj target=”_blank”

Word of the week – Aggrandize

aggrandize

Pronunciation: a-GRAN-dize
Function: verb
Etymology: French agrandiss-, stem of agrandir, from a- (from Latin ad-) + grandir to increase, from Latin grandire, from grandis great
Date: 1634
Definitions: 1: to make great or greater; INCREASE, ENLARGE
2: to make appear great or greater; praise highly
3: to enhance the power, wealth, position, or reputation of
Example: “As late as 1961, under President Dwight Eisenhower, the [National Security Council] was supported by a small staff headed by an executive secretary with a ‘passion for anonymity’ and limited to a coordinating role. In subsequent administrations, that passion disappeared and staff members took on operational duties that formerly were the responsibility of constitutionally confirmed cabinet officials. This aggrandizement of the staff function then spread to fields far beyond national security.”
– George P. Shultz, former secretary of Labor, Treasury, and State, in WSJ, 4/11/11, p. A15.

Definition source: Merriam-Webster’s Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary.

From the Weekly Grammar Tip published by ProofreadNow.com

Film Trailer released for “The Help”


Set during the 1960s in America’s racially divided Deep South, ‘The Help’ is a beautifully handled story of a white society girl, two black maids and a dangerous secret they share. Here’s a first look at the film trailer for ‘The Help’ coming soon.

5 Nice Words for Every Corporate–Using Simple PASTE Mnemonic Devices

Mnemonic devices-also called mnemonics-is one of the popular types of memorization techniques known to human kind and PASTE in one such mnemonic that helps to remember some nice words. Use of polite words and kind phrases are some of the vital interpersonal skills–especially for job seekers, corporate trainers => http://bit.ly/glII8k