“A groundbreaking new brand of presidential memoir” – Decision Points by George Bush

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Decision Points

~ George W. Bush

In this candid and gripping account, President George W. Bush describes the critical decisions that shaped his presidency and personal life.

Decision Points brings readers inside the Texas governor’s mansion on the night of the 2000 election, aboard Air Force One during the harrowing hours after the attacks of September 11, 2001, into the Situation Room moments before the start of the war in Iraq, and behind the scenes at the White House for many other historic presidential decisions.

A groundbreaking new brand of presidential memoir, Decision Points will captivate supporters, surprise critics, and change perspectives on eight remarkable years in American history—and on the man at the center of events. => http://bit.ly/10PiGAm

What really happens when a city girl becomes a farmer? – “Educating Alice” by Alice Greenup

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Educating Alice

Alice Greenup

What really happens when a city girl becomes a farmer′s wife? If you′re a fan of Rachael Treasure, you′ll love this memoir: a real-life outback love story that proves truth is even better than fiction …
′A girlfriend should know her place, Alice. First comes the mates, then the ute, then his hat, dogs, horses and last of all the girlfriend. Get that right and you might just stick around. Try to jump the queue and you′re history.′ The mouth smiled at me, but his eyes meant business.
′Well then, I′ll just have to be his mate.′
′Girls can′t be mates, Alice.′
′We′ll see.′

Includes a link so you can read a free excerpt => http://bit.ly/17PiK9h

Frank McCourt and the American Memoir

  • By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER

When Frank McCourt died last weekend at age 78, we were momentarily transported, it seemed, to a more innocent age of the American memoir.

Bebeto Matthews/Associated Press

MEMOIR MAN Frank McCourt wrote of his miserable Irish childhood in his first book, which set in motion a boom in memoirs, including some fakes.

For once, public discussion of a best-selling memoirist didn’t involve the words “fabrication,” “apologize” or “James Frey.” Instead, publishing insiders and ordinary readers alike recalled being captivated by the poetic intensity and rueful humanity of Mr. McCourt’s “Angela’s Ashes,” while former students fondly recalled the brilliant New York City public school teacher who waited until his mid-60s to finally grow up into a world-famous, Pulitzer Prize-winning author by writing down the amazing stories of his hardscrabble Irish childhood he’d been spinning out loud for years.

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